School Visit Book List 2006

During the last two weeks of May 2006,

Mrs. Mac and Mrs. K. visited North Mianus, ISD, Riverside, and Old Greenwich Schools.

Here is a list of the books they talked about.

Runny Babbit: A Billy Sook, by Shel Silverstein

Runny Babbit: A Billy Sook, written and illustrated by Shel Silverstein

Silverstein's last collection is a celebration of the spoonerism, the verbal game of transposing words' first consonants. Younger children will be challenged to figure out just what the trick is and older ones will want to imitate it in their own speech. Pick any poem as a perfect way to begin discussions about life, language, poetry,-- or just to start or end the day with a laugh.

 “...I dare anyone to read this book silently. It can’t be done.” -Karen Leggett (Children's Literature)

 

 

Babymouse: Queen of the World, by Jennifer L. Holm and Matthew Holm

Babymouse: Queen of the World, by Jennifer L. Holm and Matthew Holm

As she goes through her boring, frustrating daily routine at home and school, Babymouse wonders where the glamour and adventure can be. Her friend and helpmate since kindergarten has been Wilson the Weasel; her nemesis the popular and snooty Felicia Furrypaws. Babymouse’s wide-ranging imagination offers her adventures while she waits in vain for an invitation to Felicia’s slumber party, and when she finally gets one, she realizes the value of a real friend. This is a graphic novel for the elementary school set, full of energy, animation, dramatic adventures, and fun!

 

 

The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane, by Kate DiCamillo

The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane, by Kate DiCamillo, illustrated by Bagram Ibatoulline

Edward Tulane is a china rabbit belonging to 10-year-old Abilene. She thinks almost as highly of Edward as Edward does of himself! Even young children will soon realize that conceited Edward is riding for a fall. And fall he does, into the sea, after cruel boys rip him from Abilene's hands during an ocean voyage. Thus begins Edward's journey from watery grave to the gentle embrace of a fisherman's wife, to the care of a hobo and his dog, and into the hands of a dying girl. Then, pure meanness breaks Edward apart, and love and sacrifice put him back together-- until just the right child finds him. With every person who touches him, Edward's heart grows a little bit softer and a little bit bigger.

 

 

Whittington, by Alan Armstrong

Whittington, by Alan Armstrong

When a battered cat named Whittington arrives at Bernie's barn, he soon proves to be a welcome addition to the motley crew who live there, for he is a gifted storyteller with a fascinating story to tell. Bernie's grandchildren, Abby and Ben, fall under the spell of Whittington's marvelous tales. As Ben struggles with his reading, the Lady, a duck who is the unofficial matriarch of the group, arranges for Abby to tutor him every day in the barn. Whenever he shows signs of frustration, she calls upon Whittington to regale them with further installments of his saga. As Whittington tells the story of the man for whom he had been named, Ben wrestles with his reading, and this mismatched collection of creatures quietly support one another through travails great and small.

 

 

The Sisters Grimm: Fairytale Detectives, by Michael Buckley

The Sisters Grimm: Fairy Tale Detectives, by Michael Buckley

After their parents disappear, sisters Daphne and Sabrina Grimm are placed with a grandmother they have never heard about. Why didn't their parents mention Granny Relda? When they arrive at Relda's home in the New England town of Ferryport Landing, they are served emerald-green meatballs in rooms lined with books about magic. Then Relda reveals the truth: the girls are descended from the famous storytelling Brothers Grimm. The fairy tales that the brothers wrote are actually a history of the magical people known as Everafters, and Ferryport Landing is a magical town. When Relda goes missing, it's up to the girls and their new magical friends to rescue her and to stop a corrupt politician-- a well-cast Prince Charming.

 

 

The Penderwicks: A Summer Tale of Four Sisters, Two Rabbits, and a Very Interesting Boy, by Jeanne Birdsall

The Penderwicks: A Summer Tale of Four Sisters, Two Rabbits, and a Very Interesting Boy, by Jeanne Birdsall

Along with their loving but preoccupied botanist father and their clumsy dog, the motherless Penderwick sisters spend their summer holiday in the Massachusetts Berkshires in a rose-covered cottage on the grounds of a mansion. After a bad beginning, the girls become friends with Jeffrey, the son of the lady of the manor, difficult Mrs. Tifton, whose main concern is the welfare of her garden. Bulls attack, pet rabbits run wild, raucous soccer games threaten the formal gardens. More importantly, Mrs. Tifton’s son is liberated from the fate worse than death of being banished to a military academy. And it all happens in three weeks. Full of affectionate humor, this charming, old-fashioned story feels familiar in the way the best books seem like old friends.

 

 

The Princess Academy, by Shannon Hale

The Princess Academy, by Shannon Hale

When the local girls are rounded up to compete for the hand of the kingdom's prince, Miri, the prize student in the Princess Academy, gets her chance to shine. In addition to her natural intelligence and spunk, she discovers an intuitive, and at times unspoken, language that grew out of work songs in the mines and uses linder as a medium. With this "quarry-speech" giving a boost to her courage and intelligence, Miri leads her classmates in the fight against being treated as social inferiors in the academy, at the same time educating herself in ways that will better the village.

 

 

Jimmy Coates: Assassin?, by Joe Craig

Jimmy Coates: Assassin?, by Joe Craig

The first clue that Jimmy Coates isn't an ordinary 11-year-old comes when mysterious officials arrive at his house and announce, "We've come for the boy." When Jimmy outruns them he discovers that he can crash through second-story windows, smacking the pavement below without so much as a scrape. He soon discovers why: he is a 35 percent human/65 percent robot assassin created by NJ7, a CIA-like department of the British government!

 

 

 

Secrets of a Civil War Submarine: Solving the Mysteries of the H.L. Hunley, by Sally M. Walker

Secrets of a Civil War Submarine: Solving the Mysteries of the H.L. Hunley, by Sally M. Walker

[Non-Fiction] The Hunley earned a prominent place in history on February 17, 1864, when it became the first submarine ever to sink an enemy ship. Success quickly turned to disaster, however, and the submarine never returned to port. But what happened? How did the sub sink? How did the crew die? The clues to these questions remained hidden with the Hunley for more than one hundred years.

 

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