how much traffic is going to my site Our Picks! for April 2006: Ancient Civilizations | Perrot Memorial Library, Old Greenwich, CT

our picks!: mysteries of ancient civilizations

Special Selections from Perrot's Youth Services Staff

April 2006

 

This month's page features selections from our Winter/Spring Spotlight program for 2nd and 3rd graders, which focused on Ancient Civilizations.

We hope it will spark your interest in the exciting world of kids' non-fiction!

 

Check this page monthly for recommendations from our staff! Each month will focus on a different category of books.

We'll pick our favorites, and tell you all about them! Each book cover is a hyperlink to that item in the catalog, so click there to place a hold. 

Have questions about our picks, or need other recommendations? Call us! Our number is 203-637-8802.

Painters of the Caves, by Patricia Lauber

Painters of the Caves, by Patricia Lauber

 

[Non-Fiction] In this lavishly illustrated book, Patricia Lauber brings to life the Ice Age hunters and gatherers who were the ancestors of modern humans. Writing with clarity and enthusiasm, she examines all aspects of their lives-- from what they ate to the art they created. Well-chosen images of artifacts and artists' renditions of ancient life give context to the striking cave paintings that adorn these pages. Includes full-color photos.

 

 

I Wonder Why Stalactites Hang Down, and Other Questions About Caves, by Jackie Gaff

I Wonder Why Stalactites Hang Down and Other Questions About Caves, by Jackie Gaff

[Non-Fiction] "Where is the twilight zone?," "Who buried their dead in caves?," and "What insects feed on bat guano?" are some of the questions answered in this lively look inside caves. With information and quirky facts to explain everything from caves, chambers, and caverns to stalactites and stalagmites, this new addition to the popular I Wonder Why series answers the questions that intrigue kids most about every type of subterranean space.

 

 

Ancient Communication: From Grunts to Graffiti, by Michael Woods and Mary B. Woods

Ancient Communication: From Grunts to Graffiti, by Michael Woods and Mary B. Woods

[Non-Fiction] This book examines ancient methods of communication in the Middle East, India, China, Egypt, Greece, Rome, and Mesoamerica. Learn about the history of pictographs, alphabets, papyrus and pens, and books and libraries. Some of the things we think of as modern inventions, such as the telegraph and photocopier, actually had their roots in Ancient Greece and Rome.

 

 

The Hero Beowulf, by Eric A. Kimmel

The Hero Beowulf, by Eric A. Kimmel

[Fiction] This is a simple retelling of the Anglo-Saxon epic about the heroic efforts of Beowulf to save his people from the terrible monster, Grendel. As a child, Beowulf  borrowed his father's sword to attack a nest of savage trolls that preyed on travelers. Now a young man, he seeks to defend the Danish king Hrothgar from Grendel. The story of Beowulf is an introduction to the classic confrontation between good and evil.

 

 

The Librarian Who Measured the Earth, by Katherine Lasky

The Librarian Who Measured the Earth, by Kathryn Lasky

[Non-Fiction] Introducing a person and a period largely unknown to children, this picture-book biography depicts the life of Eratosthenes, an ancient Greek who eventually became the head of the famous library in Alexandria. His most notable achievement was a remarkably ingenious method for measuring the earth's girth. After determining the angles of shadows in two cities and the distance between them, he used geometry to calculate the earth's circumference.

 

 

The Library of Alexandria, by Kelly Trumble

The Library of Alexandria, by Kelly Trumble

[Non-Fiction] Scholars from all parts of the ancient world flocked to the great Library of Alexandria, in Egypt. The Library's patrons did not just sit and read quietly-- they dissected corpses to learn about anatomy, gazed at the stars and calculated the size of the earth, sparked controversy, and changed the course of history with their ideas. Caesar and Cleopatra, Eratosthenes and Euclid, Archimedes and Alexander the Great were just a few of the famous people connected to the library's history. And while none of its books survive and no one is even sure what it looked like, the Library of Alexandria is remembered as a place where many important theories about the world were conceived.

 

 

Hatshepsut: His Majesty, Herself, by Catherine M. Andronik

Hatshepsut: His Majesty, Herself, by Catherine M. Andronik

[Non-Fiction] Hatshepsut gained Egypt's throne when all her male siblings died. Originally named regent to her nephew, Tuthmosis III, Hatshepsut gradually assumed more and more power, and eventually had herself crowned pharaoh. Since no word existed for a female ruler, Hatshepsut used the male title. She also wore men's clothing and a beard, and referred to herself as "he" as well as "she." Hatshepsut's reign was a peaceful and prosperous one. She sent an expedition to explore Punt, an exotic land of riches, and built beautiful monuments, including a magnificent temple on which she had artists carve and paint scenes from her life and reign. Following her death, Tuthmosis III tried to erase evidence of Hatshepsut's reign to make it seem as though he had succeeded his father directly. Catherine M. Andronik explains how, despite this vandalism, archaeologists have been able to piece together the story of this unconventional pharaoh's remarkable and mysterious life.

 

 

Seeker of Knowledge: The Man Who Deciphered Egyptian Hieroglyphics, by James Rumford

 

Seeker of Knowledge: The Man Who Deciphered Egyptian Hieroglyphics, by James Rumford

[Non-Fiction] In 1802, Jean-Francois Champollion was eleven years old. That year, he vowed to be the first person to read Egypt's ancient hieroglyphs. Champollion's dream was to sail up the Nile in Egypt and uncover the secrets of the past, and he dedicated the next twenty years to the challenge. James Rumford introduces the remarkable man who deciphered the ancient Egyptian script and fulfilled a lifelong dream in the process. Stunning watercolors bring Champollion's adventure to life in a story that challenges the mind and touches the heart.

 

 

How the Amazon Queen Fought the Prince of Egypt, by Tamara Bower

 

How the Amazon Queen Fought the Prince of Egypt, by Tamara Bower

[Fiction] Queen Serpot, ruler of a land where women live free, without men, leads her Amazon warriors into battle against Prince Pedikhons of Egypt, who has come to see for himself if women can equal men. This story of love and war is based on an actual Egyptian scroll from the Greco-Roman period. Hieroglyphic translations of key phrases, intricate paintings in the Egyptian and Assyrian styles, and extensive notes about both cultures enrich this fascinating, untold legend. Includes notes about Assyrian and Egyptian culture and hieroglyphics.

 

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